Thursday, May 18, 2006

ooo... I'm a Calvinist.

So, does this make me a bad Catholic?

You scored as Anselm. Anselm is the outstanding theologian of the medieval period.He sees man's primary problem as having failed to render unto God what we owe him, so God becomes man in Christ and gives God what he is due. You should read 'Cur Deus Homo?'

Anselm

67%

John Calvin

60%

J?Moltmann

53%

Jonathan Edwards

53%

Karl Barth

53%

Martin Luther

33%

Charles Finney

33%

Friedrich Schleiermacher

33%

Augustine

33%

Paul Tillich

0%

Which theologian are you?
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Well, I disagreed with almost every statement in that thing, so maybe they just default everyone to Anselm (whoever that is) when you don't fit in any other category.

Of course, Augustine is in the list and most people assume he was Catholic, but depending on who else you happen to ask, he might have been Orthodox, Baptist, Lutheran, Free Will Baptist, Calvinist, Presbyterian, Anglican, Buddhist, yogaist, Shintoist, Amish, the first President of the United States, the pre-incarnation of Joseph Smith, an alcoholic, Jewish, the founder of Southeast Christian, or something really weird. I personally believe Augustine was a ghost. Speaking of ghosts, isn't it interesting how many times Jesus was mistaken for a ghost? I guess when you're one in being with the Holy Ghost, it's an easy mistake to make... ha ha.

Anyway, I don't really have anything worthwhile to say on this beautiful day in Louisville, Kentucky, but thanks for reading and next time I'll try to think of something halfway intelligent (I can only promise to be halfway intelligent, and I don't promise to keep my promises). Otherwise, I'll just plagiarize something off the Internets.

12 comments:

Spider in a Mason Jar said...

Since when was Anselm a Calvinist?

Jason said...

I honestly don't even know who Anselm was :)

Spider in a Mason Jar said...

11th Century Saint and Doctor of the Church:
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01546a.htm

B. Preston said...

Jason,

Since you are so much like Anselm, you really should read Cur Deus Homo (Why God became a man). Here is the link to it:
http://www.ccel.org/ccel/anselm
/basic_works.vii.html

Because of your fondness for the saints (not the NFL team), I'm surprised you don't know who Anselm is. I'm sure you'll run across him in your daily saint e-mail eventually. I would have guessed he was the saint for April 21.

Also, many philosophers think that Anslem's ontological argument for the existence of God is perhaps the greatest argument ever presented. It is essentially, "God is the Being than which a greater being cannot be conceived" (quoted from Ronald Nash, Life's Ultimate Questions: An Introduction to Philosophy, 1999)

Peace be with you.

Jason said...

Yeah, I fell behind on those Saint of the Day e-mails... there's about a month's worth that I haven't read yet and Anselm must be one of them :) I'd heard his name before, but I guess I figured he was a Reformer since I somehow scored so high for John Calvin (of course, Calvin himself was more Catholic than Calvinist, since Calvinism evolved so much from what he started).

B. Preston said...

Surely you don't believe that Calvin was essentially Roman Catholic. Here is a good test. The Doctrine of Justification is the key doctrinal difference between Rome and the Reformers. Read the Sixth Session of the Council of Trent on the Doctrine of Justification and then read Calvin's Antidote to the Sixth Session. Here are the links:

Trent:
http://history.hanover.edu
/texts/trent/ct06.html

Calvin:
http://public.csusm.edu/guests
/rsclark/Antidote.htm

Happy day

Jason said...

Well, I'm mostly exaggerating, but Calvin did believe such things as the eternal virginity of Mary and prayer to saints, as did Martin Luther. Of course, Anglicans aren't necessarily opposed to those doctrines either, so they aren't enough to make you Catholic :)

B. Preston said...

The volume of writings by these two men would say otherwise. Unless there has been a lost death-bed confession that was just recently found.

Jason said...

As far as I know, Luther always held a strong devotion to Mary and Calvin strongly defended the effectiveness of infant baptisms. When I've mentioned this before with Protestants, they usually point out that the Reformation is a process of stripping away all the "extras" of Catholicism that they believe unnecessarily cloud Christianity and the basic need that faith in Christ is all that's necessary for salvation. Of course, I agree that faith in Christ is the basis of our salvation, but Catholicism builds up my faith rather than hindering it.

Samantha said...

Jason said:
Of course, I agree that faith in Christ is the basis of our salvation, but Catholicism builds up my faith rather than hindering it.


What does that mean? How do, say, Baptists or Protestants...or Calvinists hinder faith????

Jason said...

I didn't mean to imply anything negative about other denominations. I feel like many Protestants look at Catholicism and see a bunch of practices and beliefs (like prayers to saints) which seem to take away from the plain faith in Christ that we all share. I've heard questions like, "Why is all that necessary?" or "Why should you be required to believe such-and-such just because you're Catholic?" So that's why I said Catholicism builds up my faith, rather than Catholicism hindering my faith.

Samantha said...

:D Thanks for the clarification.